Dementia Researchers Not Forgetting Lewy Body Dementia

The Mayo Clinic announced a 1 million dollar grant for Lewy Body Dementia research. There are challenges with diagnosing Lewy Body Dementia because it is closely related to both Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease. To be diagnosed with LBD a patient needs to have alzheimer’s like memory loss symptoms, Parkinson’s like physical movement disorder, as well as neuropsychiatric symptoms. These symptoms may not manifest at the same time, and often times patients are misdiagnosed. For example, a patient with Lewy Body Dementia may be misdiagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease if during the onset of the illness they have a movement disorder.

According to the Lewy Body Dementia foundations website, “In the early 1900s, while researching Parkinson’s disease, the scientist Friederich H. Lewy discovered abnormal protein deposits that disrupt the brain’s normal functioning. These Lewy body proteins are found in an area of the brain stem where they deplete the neurotransmitter dopamine, causing Parkinsonian symptoms. In Lewy body dementia, these abnormal proteins are diffuse throughout other areas of the brain, including the cerebral cortex.”

If you are concerned about developing dementia, growing research is proving exercising daily helps protect your brain from cognitive decline. One study found that older adults who were physically active suffered from less brain degradation.

Additionally, we have a list of brain friendly foods that may help protect against cognitive decline, including beets.

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5 Comments

  • My mother was diagnosed with Lewy Body Dementia. But that was wrong.

    My mother was diagnosed with Alzheimers. But THAT was wrong.

    My mother had dementia caused by high homocysteine caused by h. pylori that gave her bleeding ulcers 40 years before the h. pylori caused a B12 deficiency which caused folic acid to not be absorbed, which caused the homocysteine to accumulate. The over abundance of homocysteine caused the dementia. We gave her B6, B12, and folic acid and she woke up the next morning saying, “I feel better”. Her behavior went from paranoia to where she became my five foot two year old. She was happier and told jokes and sang songs. Her behavior improved greatly but the main part of dementia remained because it was so advanced.

    PLEASE ask your doctor to check your homocysteine levels NOW and at every check-up. Just like the doctor checks blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol. It is easy to lower it now, especially before it does damage that takes years to become dementia.

    This is my experience with “Lewy Body Dementia”. Talk to your doctor for your own sake. But research everything for yourself.

  • Research conducted about Lewy Body dementia has revealed that individuals who have adult AD/HD are three times more likely to develop Lewy Body dementia in their old age than others.

    There is a strong correlation between B-12 deficiency and brain development, so it doesn’t surprise me that somebody who was misdiagnosed with Lewy Body dementia and Alzheimer’s turned out to have B-12 deficiency, as in Linda Sue Johnson’s mother’s case. (Congratulations on pinpointing the culprit, Linda!)

    B-12 supplements are available in the form of injections and pills, but the B-12 patch has been gaining popularity, particularly with parents of autistic children who have difficulty withstanding a regimen of painful injection.

    Thank you for allowing my comments.

    Linda Socher

    b12patch.com

  • Hurrah for Mayo Clinic! Lewy body dementia is the second most common dementia and yet it is still not well researched or recognized. People with Lewy body disorders are more prone to acting-out behaviors than people with Alzheimers and yet they often have severe sensitivities to the drugs most commonly used drugs used for these behaviors. We need the research and we need more general awareness!

  • Hurrah for Mayo Clinic! Lewy body dementia is the second most common dementia and yet it is still not well researched or recognized. People with Lewy body disorders are more prone to acting-out behaviors than people with Alzheimers and yet they are prone to severe sensitivities to the drugs most commonly used for these behaviors. We need the research and we need more general awareness! 

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