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Parents, before you reach into your medicine cabinet and dole out the Tylenol, read this. A recent study out of New Zealand suggests that giving your child acetaminophen may cause allergic reactions such as asthma. This study is especially important for parents of children with preexisting allergies or asthma because Tylenol could make the conditions worse. The broad study questioned 300,000 teenagers about their asthma symptoms and their use of acetaminophen. They found a two-and-a-half times greater incidence of asthma in children that took the drug at least once a month.

At Home Tricks to Curb Asthma Attacks

Take vitamin D. Kids with asthma may breathe a sigh of relief — thanks to vitamin D. New research suggests that children with asthma who have higher vitamin D levels in their blood may be less prone to asthma exacerbation and have fewer asthma related hospitalizations, than children with lower levels.

Play a wind instrument. suggests that playing the wind instrument the didgeridoo improves respiratory function in asthmatics over time. If your child suffers from asthma, there is a chance that the breath control it takes to play a wind instrument might just improve his symptoms. A similar study presented in the Journal of Asthma that incorporated a control group supports their results. The students that played wind instruments had a significant decrease in asthma symptoms and anxiety compared to the students who played non-wind instruments.

Try the Mediterranean Diet Stronger adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern rich in fruits, vegetables and fish was associated with lower prevalence of wheezing in the past 12 months.  The Mediterranean diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fish, nuts and other foods high in healthy, monounsaturated fats, omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, and antioxidant vitamins A, C and E.

Eat Together as a Family. One research study suggests family meal time helped curb asthma attack frequency.