Diabetes risk factors are popping up daily; everywhere you look, there’s new information about what increases your chances of developing diabetes. For example, today the media reported on statins, drugs that reduce cholesterol, but may increase your risk of diabetes. But what are the proactive steps you can take to avoid developing diabetes altogether? Surprisingly, what you eat can actually help to decrease your chances of becoming a diabetic. While none of these four foods are a guarantee, studies have shown that all of them contribute to helping you stay diabetes-free.

1. Coffee – Although not everyone recommends caffeine, a study shows that caffeine can be useful in keeping diabetes at bay. Most surprisingly, the time at which you drink your java seems to matter, with a couple of cups of coffee at lunchtime reducing your risk of developing diabetes by 34 percent. Maybe you should save that coffee for a midday pick-me-up rather than a caffeine jolt in the morning.

2. Leafy greens – While eating your vegetables is always a good idea, focusing on the leafy green varieties will help you fend off diabetes. A study found that just one serving per day of leafy greens resulted in a 14 percent smaller chance of acquiring diabetes. Among the healthiest leafy greens are kale, lettuce, and spinach, meaning that in addition to being strong, it’s safe to assume that Popeye wasn’t a diabetic.

3. Magnesium – People with a high magnesium intake were found to have a 47 percent lower diabetes incidence than people with a low magnesium intake. To include sufficient magnesium in your diet, be mindful of eating whole grains, fruits, vegetables, beans, and nuts. If doing that seems too difficult, magnesium supplements are also available.

4. Brown Rice – If rice is one of the main staples of your diet, make a switch to the brown variety. White rice is more quickly converted to sugar by our bodies, contributing to dramatic spikes in blood sugar. On the other hand, eating two servings of brown rice reduces the risk of developing diabetes by 11 percent. When it comes to rice, don’t be colorblind.

Comments

  1. LindaSueJohnson says:

    What happened to broccoli? I have a friend who was taking insulin and got off of it in about a month because she ate broccoli two times a day.

  2. Chuck S. says:

    I have noticed a lowering of my blood sugar by adding a good dash of cinamon to my coffee. Is there anything to that?

  3. dharait says:

    My mom has diabetes and she is always on the border of her blood sugar count. She does have leafy greens and fruits. Brown rice is a new addition. Thanks for sharing this.

  4. GreenCrone says:

    Over 20 years ago I met a gentleman with adult-onset diabetes, who had been entirely dependent on insulin until he accidentally ran out in Mexico when his visit there was unexpectedly extended. A Mexican herbalist prescribed eating one or two pads a day of the spineless prickly pear, or nopale. This wonderful discovery allowed him to manage his diabetes without ever having to take insulin again. He subsequently grew enough nopales in S. Texas to keep him healthy. When I met him he was a spry 84 years old and had not used insulin for at least 25 years. He also pointed out that his vision, that had begun to suffer from side effects of insulin, had also stabilized when he quit taking it.

    This man, a quite scholarly oceanographer by training, did extensive research on nopales, learned that they had a rich history in Mexican traditional medicine as being therapeutic for diabetes, and he wrote a technical paper on the topic, which he then submitted to a peer-reviewed medical journal for publication.

    It was never published. The AMA squashed the paper. I guess pharmaceutical companies felt threatened by the notion of losing all those insulin sales. And don’t think the AMA isn’t in bed with the pharmaceutical companies, it is.

    Nevertheless, for people who want to try more natural approaches to diabetes management, isn’t it worth a try? Imagine growing your own medicine that causes no side effects.

    I am not diabetic and I don’t know anyone who is producing a product from nopales, but they are easy to grow in subtropical climates and could survive winters up north if brought inside. Definitely more folks should be looking into this wonderful”green” medicine.

  5. Unknown says:

    GreenCone has a interesting story, but the information seems hard to verify. The gentleman meet 20 years ago would likely be dead by now. The research paper that he tried to publish could still be published in other publications. There are a couple of companies that manufacture nopales juice, but neither have any accurate research available that relates to diabetes.

  6. forex robots says:

    If rice is one of the main staples of your diet, make a switch to the brown variety. White rice is more quickly converted to sugar by our bodies, contributing to dramatic spikes in blood sugar. On the other hand, eating two servings of brown rice reduces the risk of developing diabetes by 11 percent. When it comes to rice, don’t be colorblind.

  7. If rice is one of the main staples of your diet, make a switch to the brown variety. White rice is more quickly converted to sugar by our bodies, contributing to dramatic spikes in blood sugar. On the other hand, eating two servings of brown rice reduces the risk of developing diabetes by 11 percent. When it comes to rice, don’t be colorblind.

  8. If rice is one of the main staples of your diet, make a switch to the brown variety. White rice is more quickly converted to sugar by our bodies, contributing to dramatic spikes in blood sugar. On the other hand, eating two servings of brown rice reduces the risk of developing diabetes by 11 percent. When it comes to rice, don’t be colorblind.

  9. If rice is one of the main staples of your diet, make a switch to the brown variety. White rice is more quickly converted to sugar by our bodies, contributing to dramatic spikes in blood sugar. On the other hand, eating two servings of brown rice reduces the risk of developing diabetes by 11 percent. When it comes to rice, don’t be colorblind.

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